Mistletoe

Mistletoe is common in both europe and north asia. As a so-called semi-parasitic it grows on deciduous and coniferous trees and removes water and nutrient salts from its host plants. In addition to the stems are also poisonous leaves and berries.

Mistletoe

Surname: Mistletoe (Viscum album L.)

Occurrence

Mistletoe is common in both Europe and North Asia. As a so-called semi-parasitic it grows on deciduous and coniferous trees and removes water and nutrient salts from its host plants.

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Appearance

The evergreen shrub can grow up to a meter in diameter. The leaves and branches are yellowish green. Between March and May, inconspicuous, yellowish-green flowers grow. As of July, the mistletoe has white, glassy berries whose pulp is sticky.

Toxic parts

In addition to the stems are also poisonous leaves and berries. Main active ingredients are the so-called viscotoxins, which are toxic protein mixtures.

Possible symptoms

Mistletoes have a hypotensive effect. Greater amounts of toxins can cause gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. Sweating is also typical.

First aid

Drink a lot, that dilutes the toxic substances. If you notice any of the above symptoms, go to the doctor.

useful information

In the Christmas and New Year Mistletoe serve as a lucky charm. The Celts believed that the plant has strong magic powers. The drink prepared from the berries promised courage and invincibility. In modern medicine, mistletoe preparations are said to have a good effect on cancer. However, a recognized, scientific proof of its efficacy is still missing.

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