Transesophageal echocardiography

Transesophageal echocardiography (swallowing echo) is a cardiac ultrasound scan of the esophageal tube. Here you can read more about it!

Transesophageal echocardiography

The transesophageal echocardiography is an ultrasound examination of the heart in which the ultrasound probe is advanced over the esophagus to the level of the heart. The investigation is also called sip echo. Various heart diseases can thus be better recognized than with a normal echocardiography, in which the sound is absorbed by the chest. Learn about transesophageal echocardiography.

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Transesophageal echocardiography

  • What is transesophageal echocardiography?

  • When do you perform a transesophageal echocardiography?

  • What do you do with transesophageal echocardiography?

  • What are the risks of transesophageal echocardiography?

  • What should I watch for after transesophageal echocardiography?

What is transesophageal echocardiography?

In transesophageal echocardiography (TEE = transesophageal echocardiography), the heart and the main artery (aorta - originating in the left ventricle of the heart) are examined from the inside of the body by means of ultrasound. For this purpose, a flexible tube, at the end of an ultrasonic probe (TEE probe) sits, pushed over the esophagus to the stomach entrance. Since the esophagus is located directly behind the heart, this examination technique provides more accurate images than conventional transthoracic echocardiography, in which the transducer is placed on the outside of the chest - the lungs and ribs disturb the sound.

When do you perform a transesophageal echocardiography?

A transesophageal echocardiogram will cause the physician to have or suspect primarily of the following conditions:

  • Blood clots in the heart
  • Inflammation of the endocardium (endocarditis) and its cardiac complications
  • congenital or acquired heart valve defects
  • Outpouring of the aortic wall (aortic aneurysm)
  • Assessment of the function of artificial heart valves

The swallowing echo is also suitable for assessing the function of artificial heart valves.

For these diseases, the examination is important

  • aneurysm
  • aortic valve stenosis
  • endocarditis
  • Valvular heart disease

What do you do with transoesophageal echocardiography?

For transesophageal echocardiography, the patient must be fasting, so he must not eat or drink for at least six hours before the examination. When examining, the patient must first swallow the TEE tube. If this causes problems, the throat can be locally stunned. The gift of a tranquilizer is possible.

The doctor then pushes the tube with the ultrasound probe over the esophagus to the level of the stomach entrance to examine the heart by means of ultrasound: The images are displayed on a monitor.

What happens during heart valve surgery and when to treat with medication or a catheter.

What are the risks of transesophageal echocardiography?

In rare cases the following complications may occur in transesophageal echocardiography:

  • Injury of the esophagus
  • Injury of the larynx
  • Injuries to the teeth
  • Cardiovascular disorders in the administration of tranquilizers or analgesics
  • allergic reactions to the sedative
  • Impairment of respiration by the sedative

What should I watch for after transesophageal echocardiography?

After the TEE exam, you should not eat or drink for two hours if only the throat has been anesthetized. If you have been given tranquilizers, you should not drive or operate machines for up to 24 hours. How much time do you have for the transesophageal echocardiography If you have to plan and if you can work again after an outpatient procedure on the same day, you should discuss it with the attending physician.


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