Vomiting in children

What is vomiting? Vomiting empties the contents of the stomach by spitting it out again. Vomiting is a symptom that can be triggered by various diseases, such as a stomach or brain disease. Even poisoning can cause vomiting. Therefore you should always have your child examined by a doctor!

Vomiting in children

What is vomiting?

Vomiting empties the contents of the stomach by spitting it out again. Vomiting is a symptom that can be triggered by various diseases, such as a stomach or brain disease. Even poisoning can cause vomiting. Therefore, you should always have your child examined by a doctor !.

Vomiting is controlled by the vomiting center in the brain: emptying of the stomach takes place through multiple short contractions of the diaphragm, abdominal wall and stomach. Repeated vomiting can be a problem for the whole body: it can result in water, acid and salt loss as well as a lack of energy. These problems are the more dangerous the smaller the children are.

What types of vomiting are there?

The way your child vomits gives clues to the possible cause:

  • The Spit or spit is a vomiting of a smaller amount of food about half an hour to a full hour after the meal. In well-behaved and otherwise healthy children, this vomiting usually does not cause disease.
  • The flabby or atonic vomiting refers to the feeble strangulation or leakage of food. It may indicate a disease of the esophagus.
  • The Vomiting in the torrent is the most common form and refers to vomiting with high pressure and large quantities. It occurs, for example, in a vomiting diarrhea.
  • The Vomiting in the beam (also: spastic vomiting) refers to vomiting in a high arc about half an hour after the meal.

Which symptoms should I pay attention to?

The properties of the vomit provide information on the underlying cause. Therefore, pay attention to the appearance and smell of the vomit:

  • If the vomit smells sour, it comes from the stomach - in contrast to a neutral-smelling one that has not come into contact with stomach acid.
  • If the vomit contains greenish-brownish bile, it comes from the duodenum, and there may be a narrowing of the small intestine.
  • If it contains mucus, it may be due to bronchitis or gastritis (gastritis).
  • If the vomit stinks lazily or if it contains feces, intestinal obstruction, intussusception or deep-seated bowel constriction may be present.
  • When poisoned with detergent foams the vomit and contains plenty of air bubbles.
  • Pale red blood in the vomit indicates a bleeding above the stomach (like nosebleeds).
  • Brown-black blood admixtures are present when the blood has already been decomposed by contact with stomach acid. This can occur with swallowed blood from the oropharynx or bleeding in the stomach such as gastritis or gastric ulcer.

What can I do myself?

If your child needs vomiting, note the following:

  • Calm your child and hold it to vomit by supporting the head on the forehead. Caresses over the back calms down.
  • To counteract fluid loss, always provide the child with water or tea, possibly spoonful.
  • To compensate for the lost fluid is particularly suitable rice mucus electrolyte solutions for infants and children. These replace the salt loss.
  • Certain teas have a soothing effect on the stomach: peppermint, chamomile, goose fingering.

How does the doctor treat vomiting?

Your pediatrician can determine the cause of the vomiting and possibly take the following measures:

  • In addition to the prescription of the above-mentioned measures, the doctor may prescribe special suppositories that will alleviate the vomiting of harmless diseases.
  • If it comes to insatiable vomiting, the fluid and electrolyte loss must be replaced by an infusion. Vomiting can be stopped by this measure alone.


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